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Editor's note: This story is being highlighted in ASU Now's year in review. To read more top stories from 2017, click here . For the first woman to hold the position of U.S. national security adviser and the second to serve as secretary of state, it should come as no surprise that strength and strategy have always been in play...
Last week the federal government awarded nearly $420,000 to the Navajo and Hopi tribes to prepare for the closure of a coal-fired power plant and mine. The Navajo Generating Station in Page, Arizona, and the Kayenta Mine that supplies it with coal will shut down in 2019 unless a new owner for the power plant is found. The U.S. Department...
Two former senators, a liberal Democrat and a conservative Republican, had a discussion at Arizona State University on Thursday about how civic discourse has disintegrated and how it can be elevated. And they agreed on almost every point. “What has been prioritized is defeating the other side, and there ought to be a larger purpose,” said Jon Kyl, a Republican...
The ripple effects of Syria’s brutal civil war have been felt across the globe, and countries nearest to the epicenter are straining to accommodate a massive influx of refugees. In those areas, water is perhaps the most precious and threatened resource. That is why an Arizona State University-led team is working to bring lasting relief. One year into a two-year,...
In recent years, transcranial electrical stimulation, or tES, has seen a surge in experimental applications. The noninvasive procedure employs electrodes placed on the scalp to direct a low current through the brain to try to change aspects of its activity. The technique has shown promise in treating a variety of ailments as well as improving cognitive function and learning ability,...
ASU’s cybersecurity guru said before a U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Wednesday that massive data breaches like the recent Equifax hack, which exposed approximately 145.5 million credit records last month, is comparable to a human without an immune system. “One small intrusion can cause massive effects that can shut down the system for considerable periods of time and cause considerable damage,”...
In the 1970s and 1980s, the Soviets put landers on the surface of Venus. One survived for 57 minutes (the planned design life was 32 minutes) in an environment with a temperature of 470 degrees Celsius and a pressure of 94 Earth atmospheres. Another lasted for 127 minutes in similar conditions. Yet a third held on for 63 minutes. No...
Three years ago, Arizona State University co-founded the University Innovation Alliance (UIA), a coalition of 11 major public research universities across the country, with the goal of graduating more low-income and underserved students. In that period, the number of low-income graduates increased by 24.7 percent among participating universities, and the number of undergraduate degrees awarded overall increased 9.2 percent (from...
It’s a spacecraft the size of a shoebox, and, if all goes well, it will launch on a voyage to the moon in about two years. NASA greenlit the LunaH-Map mission two years ago. It’s the first NASA mission for Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration. It’s going to look for ice on the moon, which can...

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